A History of Candy Innovation

For more than 125 years, Hershey has been exploring new heights of delicious candy potential.

From classic milk chocolate recipes to marvelous candy innovations, we’re always improving on our history of confectionary invention. This rich history means there’s ingenuity in every bite of Hershey chocolate and candy. Explore the timeline below to see how every new addition to the Hershey family of products has meant more goodness to share, more flavors to taste and more stories to tell.

2016

BARKTHINS

It's not a treat. It's a snack. And it's all good if you want some snacking chocolate every day because barkTHINS is packed with Fair Trade chocolate and simple ingredients.

2011

BROOKSIDE

The first chocolate-covered strawberry is said to have been dipped in the 1960s. Today, BROOKSIDE Candy answers the call for rich dark chocolate and fruit combinations.

2000

ICE BREAKERS

We’ve come a long way from chewing on leaves. With their dazzling flavor crystals, ICE BREAKERS Mints and Gum signaled a trend of viewing mints as candy.

BREATH SAVERS

Recognize that nautical shape? Like their fruity counterpart, Life Savers, BREATH SAVERS Mints were designed to look like a life preserver.

BUBBLE YUM

Unwrap, chew, pop! BUBBLE YUM Bubble Gum made candy history by being especially soft, unlike its tough competition.

 

1996

PAYDAY

Nickel for your thoughts? As part of a 1989 promotion, each PAYDAY Peanut Caramel Bar came with a free nickel (individually wrapped, of course).

GOOD & PLENTY

All aboard! This American twist on licorice pastilles was advertised with an engineer named Choo Choo Charlie, whose train ran on GOOD & PLENTY Candies.

ZERO

The mysterious ZERO Candy Bar gets its name from the temperature zero degrees – that’s to say, it’s very cool! Polar bears on the original packaging highlighted this frosty connection. 

JOLLY RANCHER

After trying his hand at ice cream, Bill Harmsen of Golden, CO, launched JOLLY RANCHER Hard Candy because it would sell even through the winter. 

WHOPPERS

You don’t need a straw to enjoy this classic confection! The iconic milk carton they come in is a nod to the malted milk inside WHOPPERS Malted Milk Balls.

HEATH

The HEATH Toffee Bar was made by hand until 1942, when they switched to commercial production to keep up with a huge order from the U.S. Army.

MILK DUDS

Though their flavor is perfect, the MILK DUDS Candy shape is not: The “duds” in their name refers to the fact that they would never come out round at the factory.

ZAGNUT

The toasty, crunchy, coconut-ty ZAGNUT Candy Bar has a cameo in the movie “Beetlejuice”!

1989

HERSHEY’S SYMPHONY

Though it looks like a classic chocolate bar, HERSHEY’S SYMPHONY Milk Chocolate Bar was developed to taste more like the mild chocolate formula popular in Europe at the time.

1988

CADBURY

CADBURY CREME EGGS actually have a mascot! He’s a white bunny who clucks like a chicken, as seen in the classic Easter commercial.

ALMOND JOY

The introduction of the ALMOND JOY Candy Bar represented a new flavor profile for American candy, which didn’t commonly use coconut.

MOUNDS

The MOUNDS Candy Bar, the fraternal twin of the ALMOND JOY Candy Bar, was so popular with soldiers during World War II, the U.S. military made about 80 percent of all MOUNDS Candy purchases.

YORK

To differentiate from its more gooey competitors, each YORK Peppermint Pattie had to pass a “snap test”: It was only fit to sell if it snapped cleanly down the middle.

1986

5TH AVENUE

Reflecting a growing interest in cosmopolitan glamour, the 5TH AVENUE Candy Bar was named to evoke the New York City thoroughfare of the same name.

1981

SKOR

The rich SKOR Chocolate Butter Toffee Bar was created to compete with the HEATH Toffee Bar. Today, the former rivals are part of the same candy family!

1978

WHATCHAMACALLIT

Hershey came up with 100 possible names for this treat before deciding on WHATCHAMACALLIT Candy Bar!

1977

TWIZZLERS Candy

Rumor has it that the second comment Neil Armstrong made after his historic moon landing was “I could go for some TWIZZLERS right now.”

1969

KIT KAT®

KIT KAT® Wafer Bars came about as a sweet and portable snack you could pack in your lunch box for work.

ROLO®

The pieces in a roll of ROLO® Creamy Caramels have been said to look like anything from a bucket to a lampshade.

1963

REESE’S

The classic REESE’S Peanut Butter Cup was actually invented by a former Hershey employee named Harry Burnett Reese.

1927

S’mores

The first documented s’mores recipe comes from the Girl Scouts of America, using the same ingredients we use today: marshmallow, graham cracker and a HERSHEY’S Milk Chocolate Bar!

1925

MR. GOODBAR

Hershey first released the MR. GOODBAR Chocolate with Peanuts Bar under the fictitious “Chocolate Sales Corporation.”

HERSHEY’S Chocolate Syrup

Before the introduction of this convenient bottled chocolate syrup, pharmacists would mix their own from cocoa powder to mask the taste of medicine.

1908

HERSHEY’S Milk Chocolate with Almonds

Just like in 1908, every almond that makes it into a HERSHEY bar is individually selected for quality.

1907

HERSHEY’S KISSES

HERSHEY’S KISSES Candy actually used to be wrapped by hand. Imagine how long it would take to wrap the 70 million made daily now!

1900

HERSHEY’S Milk Chocolate

Through lots of trial and error, Hershey successfully re-created the recipe for milk chocolate, which at the time was closely guarded by the Swiss.

1894

HERSHEY’S Cocoa

The original HERSHEY’S Cocoa tin showed a baby in a cocoa pod – dubbed the Cocoa Bean Baby.

As you can see, it’s been quite a journey ...

Through new product development, acquisitions and a never-ending tradition of candy innovation, Hershey history is still being written. And as a Hershey fan, you’re part of that story. We can’t wait to share what’s next with you!